Gaggenau
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Playing
with fire.

The Journey
is the Destination.

A Canvas for the
New Nordic Cuisine.

Poetry
for the walls.

Stone Renaissance.

The “wild boy”
of winemaking.

More

Drinking
the real stars.

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Light means
quality of life.

More
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Culinary Delights & Wine

Playing with fire.

The history of the human race has been decisively shaped by the knowledge ofhow to cook food over a flame. A few fearless men are proving that even today it ispossible to be a renowned chef while renouncing electricity and gas.

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New Seasons.

There is a fresh wind blowing through international kitchens. The stronghold of men is troubled by a bunch of young, creative and powerful female chefs.

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From the spirit
of nature.

Unique distillates are created in the Stählemühle distillery in Baden based on modern know-how and centuries-old artisan skills. The precious nature of these distillates is due to the wealth of fruit trees, herbs and wild fruits.

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Savour
the earth.

Young Sicilian winemaker Arianna Occhipinti produces excellent organic wines that are a pure expression of the soil in which they grow.

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The “wild boy”
of winemaking.

Charles Smith, a self-taught winemaker, has become one of the most successful vintners in the Pacific Northwest while eschewing most of the industry’s conventions.

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Drinking
the real stars.

Do you like bubbles? Do you love champagne? Are you curious? If so, why not try the terroir Champagnes produced by a young breed of growers? It’s worth giving them a chance.

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The world’s best
new wine bars.

Today the best wines are not widely available. They are organic, biodynamic, unadulterated and preservative-free wines made by small family domaines. Collectively, these wines are called natural wines. They can be red, white, pink, orange, green and even black.

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A taste
for experiments.

Luke Dale-Roberts is a restless soul. For his restaurant, The Test Kitchen, in Cape Town this is a great blessing. “I cannot stand still”, says the award-winning chef. “I’ve always got to keep going. When new ideas take shape, then I’m happy”.

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The Salt
of Life.

Angelo Garro (67) has a passion for firing things up. He is a blacksmith by training, a lifelong foodie by heart. Born and raised in Sicily, he’s been forging and cooking for the past 30 years in San Francisco. His Renaissance Forge has become an informal hub for a small community celebrating quality foods and cooking.

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Demon
at the stove.

Hong Kong's celebrity chef mixes the traditions of China with modern techniques and unusual presentation. The "demon chef" has already won three Michelin stars at his restaurant Bo Innovation.

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The taste of
Norway.

Oslo restaurant Maaemo has fundamentally altered the culinary landscape of Norway in just three years. Head chef Esben Holmboe Bang sends his guests on a voyage of discovery through regional cuisine.

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The sixth
taste.

"Some say umami is the fifth gustatory sensation, or taste. I say that smoke is the sixth taste," says author Edward Lee ("Smoke and Pickles"), who appreciates things that are smoked, like these hops on juniper wood (photo).

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Design & Culture

The journey is the destination.

In a hidden and surprising corner of suburban North London, the designers Tim Simpson and Sarah van Gameren, who form the Studio Glithero, produce an impressive range of furniture, products and installations.

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A canvas for the
new nordic cuisine.

24-year old Polish ceramist Magdalena Kałużna forms the tableware for the bestdishes. Several of the acclaimed chefs of the Scandinavian food revolution rely onthe artist’s plates and cups, which are the perfect background for their creations.

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Poetry for the walls.

Plain white walls are passé. We are once again treating ourselves to opulent walls covered with historic patterns, modern designs, or the kinds of personalised wallpaper and panels that are created by a very special company in Berlin.

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A Blazing fire.

At the Blenheim Forge three young bladesmiths work with a passion for ancient craftsmanship and a single-minded determination to renew it.

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Art
made by hand.

A new generation of craftsmen is creating contemporary designs and moving long-disdained handicrafts back into the mainstream — fulfilling the wishes of clients who are looking for something special.

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Contemporary art
for the floor.

Whether stylish apartment or minimalist villa – intricately crafted carpets with diverse motifs are in vogue again. The computer takes care of the design, venturing into the world of the traditional weavers in Asia in calculating which knots go where.

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Light means
quality of life.

For Munich-based lighting designer Axel Meise, it's all about the right lighting.

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A Designer
with Aura.

Sebastian Herkner designs objects of intrepid character that seem to hover in their lightness.

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Making
light work.

With their ingenious lights made from recycled materials, the American-Dutch design company, graypants, is creating rather a stir. Simple yet consistent ideas, a great feel for the effect of light, sustainability and social responsibility are the hallmarks of these young designers.

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When design
becomes magic.

A bench like a fallen tree – the trunk is tamed to create the seat area while the crown remains wild and free. Benjamin Graindorge's designs break from convention, yet always remain functional.

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Anything
glows.

OLEDs or organic light emitting diodes allow light to assume any shape and hide behind any surface. This could revolutionise the world of design and architecture.

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Noblesse
oblige.

Pots, pans and saucepans from de Buyer are clearly among the aristocrats of kitchen accessories. Scarcely any wonder really since the manufactory located in the Vosges region of France owes the quality of its products not least to the mysteries of haute cuisine.

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Rigorously
purist.

Less is more. London-based Cypriot Michael Anastassiades (born 1967) prefers a totally minimalist design. And he likes to work with wood, stone and metals. "These are honest materials that also age honestly."

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Architecture & Spaces

Stone renaissance.

In the Italian Alps more and more mountain villages and their old stone houses are being abandoned by their inhabitants. But now there is hope. A brave globetrotter, volunteers, local craftsmen and international experts are fighting the decay.

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Resurrected
from the ruins

A dilapidated historic farmhouse has been transformed into an avant-garde architectural concept, with a house within a house.

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Making
connections.

LA Architect Michael Maltzan has a vision: creating purposeful linkages between people and buildings that are as aesthetically and emotionally pleasing as they are good for modern urban life.

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Trees grow
over Milan.

The “Bosco Verticale” in Milan is a model for a sustainable residential building, a project for metropolitan reforestation that contributes to the regeneration of the environment and urban biodiversity without the need to expand the city’s territory.

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Houses with
secrets.

At Lake Maggiore, three Swiss architects are trying to give something back to the grandiose landscape. They are creating houses that grow out of the topography and interact sensitively with natural stone, different wood species and rough concrete.

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Pure luxury
in the desert.

Seldom does the vastness of the American West feel so magical. The Amangiri Resort ( peaceful mountain) is tucked into a protected valley in Southern Utah, surrounded by deep canyons, towering plateaus and table mountains or mesas.

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Visionary
mansions.

Architects sometimes dream of buildings that are simply unique. If they also manage to meet increased sustainability requirements, the results may look like the island retreat created by New Zealand's Fearon Hay Architects (photo).

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Ingenious
space fillers.

Ingenious architects manage to put even difficult pieces of land to good use. One of them is Yasuhiro Yamashita (Atelier Tekuto), who built his two-meter-wide "Lucky Drops House" on only 22 square meters in Tokyo (photo).

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Quiet
places.

Arthur Miller did all his writing in a simple summer cabin. Today, such places of retreat are being designed by architects – with spectacular results. One such example is the little artists hut named Bridge Studio on Fogo Island in Canada (photo).

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Adding contrast makes
old buildings new again.

Putting old buildings to new uses requires adding parts and remodeling existing ones. If done well, the resulting formal contrasts can produce stunning results. This Victorian industrial building in Sheffield, Great Britain (photo), for example, was topped with an addition that provides a modern contrast.

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